FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: May 17, 2012
Contact: Rick DeBruhl, Chief Communications Officer
Phone: 602.340.7335, Mobile: 602.513.6385
Email: rick.debruhl@staff.azbar.org

Attorney Meyer Ziman Suspended for Engaging in Offensive Conduct

PHOENIX - May 17, 2012 - Attorney Meyer L. Ziman was suspended from the practice of law for one year after violating several Rules of Professional Conduct. He was given the sanction by a three-member hearing panel led by the Presiding Disciplinary Judge of the Supreme Court of Arizona.

The State Bar alleged a pattern of misconduct in three separate matters, including failing to refrain from engaging in unprofessional and offensive conduct,  and representing a disabled individual, with diminished capacity, that resulted in a conflict of client interest.

Resulting from the Bar's investigation and a two-day hearing, the disciplinary panel found that Ziman violated several Rules of Professional Conduct. The 31-page order details how he engaged in offensive conduct when communicating with individuals who were essential in providing records for the two client cases. He also failed to seek independent legal advice and obtain written legal consent for a disabled client whose interests were materially limited by the mother and father's interests.

The order also states that Ziman failed to adhere to the provisions set forth in the Supreme Court Rules, Oath of Admission to the State Bar, and the Lawyer's Creed of Professional Conduct. The disciplinary panel found his testimony to be jaded and unapologetic, stating that "he knows the rules but believes he is superior to them, ignores them intentionally, and is explosive when he does not receive the special treatment to which he feels entitled."

Ziman has a history of misconduct, dating back to 1993, which was found to be an aggravating factor in the panel's decision.

It was ordered that Meyer L. Ziman be suspended from the practice of law for one year, effective April 30, 2012. After completing his suspension, he must undergo formal reinstatement proceedings where the terms and conditions of his two-year probation period will be determined. He must also participate in the State Bar's Law Office Management Assistance Program (LOMAP) and the  Member Assistance Program (MAP), as well as pay all costs and expenses associated with the proceedings to the Arizona Supreme Court and the State Bar of Arizona.

Both Ziman and the State Bar can appeal the panel's decision.


About the State Bar
The State Bar of Arizona is a non-profit organization that operates under the supervision of the Arizona Supreme Court. The Bar includes approximately 16,900 active attorneys and provides education and development programs for the legal profession and the public. Since 1933 the Bar and its members have been committed to serving the public by making sure the voices of all people in Arizona are heard in our justice system.

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