Health Exchange FAQ

What is the exchange? 
The State Bar of Arizona Health Exchange is a partnership with American Health Insurance Exchange. It provides an alternative to the government exchange for people wanting health insurance. 
Why use this exchange?
The State Bar of Arizona Health Insurance Exchange provides more choices and better customer service than the government exchange. Not only is there a greater variety of health plans, but agents on the exchange can give advice and recommendations, which is something consumers can’t get on the government exchange.
Does the State Bar Exchange include an ACA approved plan?
No. Unlike previous years, there is only one ACA approved provider for Arizona. That company has chosen not to participate in the State Bar Exchange. 
Why choose a non-ACA health plan?
Non-ACA approved health plans may carry a tax penalty. However, in some circumstances, the total cost may be less than an ACA plan. You need to carefully weigh your options as to which type of plan is best for you.
What is the American Health Insurance Exchange?
American Health Insurance Exchange (AHIX), a division of JLBG Health is the #1 provider of branded Affinity Health Insurance Exchanges in the US with more than 350 clients including the National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB), The American Bar Association (ABA), and the American Medical Association (AMA). JLBG has an A+ rating with the Better Business Bureau.
What types of plans are available through the Bar’s exchange?

  • Medicaid enrollment
  • State/Federal Exchange enrollment with subsidies
  • Private Exchange options
  • Non-qualified health plans

Are dental and vision plans available?
Yes. Dental and vision plans are available and do not have to be purchased with health insurance. 
Will the Bar receive income this partnership?
The State Bar of Arizona will receive marketing revenue from AHIX based on member participation. This non-dues revenue will be used offset the cost of other programs at the Bar. 
Can non-Bar members use this exchange?
Yes, the Affordable Care Act does not permit limits on exchange access. 

COMMON 2018 OPEN ENROLLMENT QUESTIONS



When does Open Enrollment end?
Open Enrollment ends 12-15-2017 for the 2018 plan year. In order to have coverage effective January 1st you MUST enroll by 12-15-2017.
What are my options for the 2018 plan year?
Aside from an employer plan, Medicaid or Medicare, government, military or tribal plan, your 2018 plan options are an Affordable Care Act (ACA)/"Obamacare" plan or NON-ACA plan. 
I have an ACA plan that is being cancelled, what other plans are available?
There are other ACA plans, but even fewer than last year. In addition, ACA rates have increased substantially. Family premiums for people that do not receive a subsidy are expensive. You can use the Plans/Pricing link above to shop and enroll in 2018 plans.
My doctor and hospital doesn't take any of the ACA HMO plans on the government marketplace, do you have a PPO plan?
Many of the 2018 ACA plans offer narrow HMO networks instead of full PPO networks. If you're unable purchase an ACA PPO in your area, you might want to consider a NON-ACA PPO plan.
I don't qualify for a low income subsidy and can't afford an ACA plan, do you have health insurance that is more affordable?
Yes. Depending on your needs, a NON-ACA plan may be a good option.
What is a NON-ACA plan?
NON-ACA plans offer a full nationwide PPO network, last up to 12 months and are an affordable option for people that want coverage for an unexpected illness or injury. You must be healthy and qualify for a NON-ACA plan, and they do not cover maternity, mental health, substance abuse or pre-existing conditions.
"I want a regular plan", or "I want a long term plan", or "I don't want a temporary or short term plan."
 Prior to ACA, plans were considered 'long term' because the deductible, benefits and doctor networks would stay the same from year to year unless YOU changed them, only the rates changed each year. You bought a plan that fit your needs, and you could keep your plan for as long as you paid the premiums. You could not be cancelled, and very rarely would an insurance carrier go out of business, cancel all policyholders, and stop offering new policies for sale. The 'regular', 'long-term' plans of the past no longer exist. 
Basically all ACA plans reset each year. The carriers, benefits, medical access and cost options for the 2018 plan year will be different for the 2019 plan year. Prior to ACA people only bought 'short-term' plans when they were between jobs, for periods of 1-12 months. Today people buy short term coverage as an affordable alternative to ACA. People have assets to protect and want coverage for unexpected illness or injury. The NON-ACA plans offerrd last up to 12 months, and depending on your needs and budget may be a better option for the 2018 plan year. If your circumstances change, you can enroll in a new plan during Open Enrollment next fall.
Isn't Congress going to Repeal/Replace ACA?
ACA has not been repealed, although it is likely that sweeping changes will take place during 2018 for the 2019 plans year. The goal is to figure out what works best for plan year 2018. We will let you know when new options and plans are made available.
I'm on medication or receiving medical care I need the insurance company to pay for, will a NON-ACA plan help me?
No, NON-ACA plans only pay for unexpected illness or injuries. If you're receiving medical care or prescriptions you need covered and paid for by the insurance company, then ACA is probably your best option. Remember, that in most cases you must satisfy your deductible before the plan will start paying for treatment or prescriptions.
Won't I have to pay a penalty if I don't purchase an ACA plan?
Yes, unless you have an exemption. Due to the cost of 2018 ACA plans, some members will qualify for the Code A' Coverage Exemption. You qualify for the exemption if the least expensive Bronze ACA plan is more than 8.16% your household income. You can easily determine if you're eligible for the CODE A exemption using a calculator by clicking here. Check with your tax advisor, and be sure they use the new 2018 rates when calculating your eligibility.




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